2020-admin news

Adrian Olivier appointed as Chair of the Historic Environment Forum

The Historic Environment Forum (HEF) announces that Adrian Olivier has been appointed as Chair. Adrian has worked at a senior level across a wide range of heritage activities, crossing traditional professional and subject-based boundaries, and has a broad operational perspective alongside a strong understanding of the wider historic environment. He had a long-term involvement as a lead expert for the Council of Europe, and he continues to work closely with European and international organisations, alongside national bodies devoted to the protection and promotion of the historic environment. “The essential purpose of the Historic Environment Forum is to foster collaboration and coordination between its members – Adrian commented – and I am absolutely delighted to be given this opportunity to contribute to the work of the Forum and to help the sector work collectively to develop and pursue its common objectives”.

Adrian succeeds the present interim Chair, Dr Ben Cowell, Director General of Historic Houses, who commented: “The Historic Environment Forum brings together all of the leading organisations with an interest in the historic environment in England. It has been an honour for me to serve as interim HEF Chair while the search was on to find a replacement for the outgoing chair, John Sell. With his substantial experience in the sector Adrian Olivier is an inspired choice as the new HEF chair, and I look forward to working with him in this role.”

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June Heritage Chat- ‘Strengthening collaboration between the heritage sector, higher education institutions and community groups’

June’s Heritage Chat explored how collaboration can be strengthened between the heritage sector, higher education institutions and community groups. Participants discussed what the key elements are for positive collaboration and what can hinder progress. They also discussed how collaboration can proceed despite a lack of funding, with an additional focus on what collaboration will look like in a post-lockdown world. Many brilliant examples of collaborative projects were shared. The Heritage 2020 Discovery, Identification and Understanding group will use these to help with their work to build a selection of case studies that provide examples of a range of collaborative projects, how to get them started, the benefits they can bring, and how to get the best out of them.

Please find a full summary of the chat here.

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Digital Skills in Heritage #HeritageChat- Summary

The May 2020 #HeritageChat was designed in collaboration with The Heritage Alliance which is one of four partners in the Heritage Digital consortium project focused on digital skills development for the heritage sector. The chat provided the opportunity to discuss the digital skills that heritage organisations see themselves as needing to improve upon, as well as providing an opportunity to celebrate success stories. Topics discussed included digital accessibility, the most effective means for which digital skills can be used in the heritage sector, and how digital tools can be used in the classroom for heritage purposes. There was also a focus on how ‘digital’ can be used to boost heritage tourism.

Read a full summary of the discussions here.

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Upcoming Heritage Chat- Digital Skills

Our monthly Heritage 2020 Twitter Chat, #HeritageChat, will take place on Thursday 21st May (1 – 2 pm) on the theme of ‘Digital Skills in Heritage’. It has been designed in collaboration with The Heritage Alliance which is one of four partners in the Heritage Digital consortium project focused on digital skills development for the heritage sector.

This Heritage Chat is an opportunity to discuss the digital skills that heritage organisations see themselves as needing to improve, as well as providing an opportunity to celebrate success stories.  Please follow @HeritageChat to take part on the day.

We’re collecting suggestions for questions or issues that you’d like to see discussed as part of the Digital Skills in Heritage Chat on our Google Doc: https://bit.ly/2LfyKvA

This document will be live until 17th May. After that we’ll share the questions that will be used as part of the chat through @Heritage2020, @HeritageChat and https://www.heritage2020.net/get-involved/heritage-chat/.

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Impact of COVID-19 on heritage sector #HeritageChat

Historic Houses Association image for HeritageChat December 2017

April’s Heritage Chat was an opportunity to build on work being done by Historic England, The Heritage Alliance and through the Historic Environment Forum and Heritage 2020 to discuss the immediate and longer-term issues that heritage sector organisations (from self-employed individuals, to large organisations) are facing due to COVID-19. Topics included how they are addressing these issues; what support exists to help the sector through this very difficult time; and where there are gaps in support. Lots of resources were shared among participants, particularly relating to funding bids and building new digital skills. Read the full summary here.

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March #HeritageChat- Archaeology and Innovation

March’s Heritage Chat was led by the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA) and explored archaeology and innovation. CIfA are currently working with the Association of Local Government Archaeology Officers (ALGAO) on a project funded by Historic England to explore innovation and also, how historic environment professionals can learn about and incorporate innovative practice. The aim of the project is to build sector capacity and promote innovative approaches to maximise public benefit. This #HeritageChat forms part of the project and discussed the nature of innovation, the barriers to it and how the sector can better promote innovative initiatives. Read a full summary here.

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Heritage Crime- February’s #HeritageChat

February’s Heritage Chat was led by Historic England (tweeting as @HeritageCrime) and discussed all things relating to Heritage Crime. The chat began by defining what heritage crimes are and which are the most common. Conversations then moved to discussing the ways in which stronger community engagement with historic sites and strategic partnerships could be used to reduce rates of heritage crime. Excellent examples were shared of initiatives that are already in place. Discussions towards the end of the chat focused on whether sentencing for heritage crimes is appropriate and whether the Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) is used to repay the public heritage debt from the criminal loss of heritage assets. Throughout the chat contributors shared excellent guidance on preventing and reporting heritage crime.

Read a full summary here.

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Heritage and creative industries #HeritageChat

January’s #HeritageChat explored the relationship between the heritage sector and the creative industries and discussions built upon the Heritage Alliance’s recent publication of their report Inspiring Creativity, Heritage and the Creative Industries. Participants shared examples of successful partnerships that led to wider audience engagement and improved accessibility to heritage sites and stories. Also, discussed were the skills and approaches needed to make partnerships successful and the challenges that might present themselves along the way. You can read a full summary of the chat here.

Our next Heritage Chat will take place on 20 February (13:00-14:00) and will explore heritage crime. Make sure you follow @HeritageChat to take part. You can find more information about suggesting topics or leading a Heritage Chat here: https://www.heritage2020.net/heritage-chat/

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November’s #HeritageChat on the growth of citizen heritage science projects

November’s #HeritageChat explored how the growth of citizen heritage science projects can be improved. In particular, discussions focused on what types of citizen science projects are particularly effective in engaging people with heritage and provided an opportunity for people and organisations who have experience in organising such projects, to provide tips to others looking to do so. Advice was offered on determining audiences, the best methods of collecting data and the pitfalls to look out for. Existing guidance on running a citizen science project was also shared.  You can read a full summary of the discussions here.

Our next #HeritageChat will take place on 19 December (13:00-14:00). Please contact us if you would like to lead this session or have an idea for a particular topic that you would like to see explored. You can email us at heritage2020@theheritagealliance.org.uk .

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October’s #HeritageChat on engaging 16-24 year olds with heritage

October’s #HeritageChat explored why the 16-24-year-old age group are underrepresented in terms of engagement with heritage, which is currently a key focus of the H2020 Public Engagement working group.  Both the 2017/18 and 2018/19 DCMS ‘Taking Part’ Surveys revealed that this age group visited heritage sites less frequently than other age groups between 25 and 74. In light of this, the working group want to ensure a greater emphasis is placed on involving young people in all aspects of work in heritage and the historic environment. To works towards this, they used the chat as an opportunity to learn about the work that is already happening and to source ideas from heritage professionals and students about what could be improved.

Discussion points during the hour included whether the statistics reflect the everyday experience in the sector, what problems there are that impact upon a ‘heritage offer’ for 16-24-year olds, and whether low engagement rates could also be caused by perceptions of heritage among the age group. Participants also shared what has worked and been popular in their experience and ideas of what could increase engagement in the future.

You can catch up on all the conversations that took place here.

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